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“Right in the beginning, in Genesis, God talks about how He created plants, vegetables and
fruits that bear seed after their own kind... What that says to you is that once you have this
plant or vegetable, you have its future generations in seed form. And it’s all free!”

~ Paul Gautschi ~

Seed Types

Hybrid Seed

In agriculture and gardening, hybrid seed is seed produced by cross-pollinated plants. In hybrid seed production, the crosses are specific and controlled. The advantage of growing hybrid seed compared to inbred lines comes from heterosis.

 Heirloom Seed

The definition is open to dispute. But the term is usually applied to fruit, flower or vegetables varieties that were being grown before World War II.

Back then, what we now call "organic gardening," based on manure and mulch, was standard practice for home gardeners, who accepted risk and variation from weather and disease just as farmers had to.

From the 1950s to the 1970s, hybrids dominated the commercial vegetable market, and the older varieties became hard to find until a growing interest in cooking and food sparked a resurgence of the more flavorful heirlooms. Heirloom varieties are open-pollinated--meaning that unlike hybrids, seeds you collect from one year will produce plants with most of the characteristics of the parent plant. And that's key to their survival.

Many heirloom varieties were preserved by home gardeners who saved seed from their family gardens from year to year. Other seeds travelled around the world in the pockets or letters of immigrants, which is why, though the tomato evolved in Central America, we have varieties from Russia, Italy, Japan, France,and Germany.

Genetically Modified Organism(GMO)

 Are seeds that have had their genetic make-up altered by replacing certain genes with  genes from a totally different species, with the hope that the resulting plants will now have certain ‘desirable’ characteristics. Have had their genetic make-up altered by replacing certain genes with genes from a totally different species, with the hope that the resulting plants will now have certain ‘desirable’  Characteristics. Example: Cold water fish gene spliced into a tomato to make it frost hardy.

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